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News of The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
 
Thursday, March 30, 2017, at 12.00 noon
Lotos Club
5 East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065
30th Annual Erwin Piscator Award Luncheon
to benefit our International Educational Programs
James C. Nicola will be presented with the Erwin Piscator Award 2017 for his enormous contributions to the American theatre by producing and cultivating artists whose works inspire and challenge the public. Since 1988 he has been Artistic Director of New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW). Under his guidance, NYTW has remained steadfast to its founding commitment of nurturing both established and emerging theatre artists, promoting collaboration and bold experimentation with theatrical forms. As Artistic Director, Mr. Nicola has been instrumental in the development of many of NYTW world premieres, including Once; Peter and the Starcatcher; Jonathan Larson's Rent; Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen's Aftermath; Claudia Shear's Blown Sideways Through Life and Dirty Blonde; and Will Power's The Seven, as well as the American premieres of Caryl Churchill's Mad Forest, Far Away, and A Number; and Doug Wright's Quills and Tony Kushner's Homebody/Kabul. Mr. Nicola fueled his love of theatre during the early 1970s when he was an Assistant Director at The Young Vic / National Theatre of Great Britain and an Assistant Stage Manager at London's Royal Court Theatre.
The philanthropist Marina Kellen French will receive the Honorary Erwin Piscator Award in memory of Maria Ley Piscator for her lifelong commitment and tireless dedication to support the arts and culture. Mrs. French has served on the Trustee Council of the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. for 35 years. She also has been serving on the Board of the Metropolitan Opera for 37 years, and served on the Board of the Metropolitan Opera Guild. After the death of her father, Stephen Kellen, in 2004 Mrs. French became a Trustee of Carnegie Hall, continuing the family's tradition: For the past 34 years the Kellen's, through their foundation, have made it possible for the Berlin Philharmonic to come to New York and give concerts at Carnegie Hall's Stern Auditorium. At the initiative of Clive Gillinson Marina became involved as one of the founding patrons to launch the National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America. As a Trustee at the American Academy in Berlin, which is housed in the childhood-home of her mother Anna-Maria Kellen, Mrs. French has endowed the Marina Kellen French Distinguished Visitorship for persons with outstanding accomplishments in the cultural world. In 2012, Mrs. French became a Trustee at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In addition, Marina is a Life Trustee of the Morgan Library and of Channel 13, and also serves on the Director's Circle of the Frick Collection. In 2014, she was awarded the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany.
Admission: $ 350 (tickets are tax-deductible for the full amount less $ 85)
To receive an invitation please contact Michael Lahr by eMail
 
Thursday, February 16, 2017, at 7.30 pm
Austrian Cultural Forum
11 East 52nd Street
New York, NY 10022
Suffering and Longing in Exile
Stefan Zweig and Frédéric Chopin – A Musical-Literary Collage
On February 22, we commemorate the 75th anniversary of the death of Stefan Zweig. Desperate and depressed that the “World of Yesterday” which he had so brilliantly analyzed and portraited in his autobiography, was forever lost, he committed suicide in Brazil.
After the end of World War I, Zweig had worked for a spiritually united Europe, in which there was no room for nationalism and revenge. Molded by the spirit and the work of Erasmus of Rotterdam, Zweig was deeply convinced of the inner personal freedom of man, and inspired by the idea of Europe.
Once Stefan Zweig wrote to the German composer Richard Strauss: “All real works of art have the power to overcome resistance.” Zweig was enough of a realist to see what the world around him was really like. But he does not stop at just picturing this world of reality. Many of Zweig’s experiences are highly topical today. His books move us to develop energies for doing away with the deplorable state of affairs he describes. Every line challenges us, his readers, to overcome our own sluggishness of the heart.
A century earlier, composer Frédéric Chopin also experienced the sufferings and longings of life in exile. Especially in his more than 60 Mazurkas, those pieces based on the traditional Polish dance, Chopin expressed the longing for his native Poland which he had left in 1830 at the age of 20. Shortly thereafter the November Uprising took place. When the uprising was crushed a little later, Chopin felt extreme anguish. He would never return to Poland.
Giving succinct, insightful remarks, Marjan Kiepura will interpret four famous works by Chopin, including two Mazurkas.
Michael Lahr will introduce Zweig’s life and work and his continuing relevance.
Gregorij von Leitis will read Stefan Zweig’s texts.
Admission: free – reservations are necessary and can be made on the website oft he Austrian Cultural Forum at www.acfny.org (please click on „events“ and go the date of February 16 to find this particular event)
Presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum New York
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo ACF NYC
 
Tuesday, February 1, 2017, at 6.30 pm
Central Synagogue
Ekzarh Joseph 10
1000 Sofia / Bulgarien
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts.
Admission: free – reservations and further information by eMail
presented by the German Embassy Sofia and the Central Synagogue Sofia
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo Deutsche Botschaft in Sofia
Logo Synagoge Sofia
 
Friday, January 27, 2017, at 7.30 pm
Parish Hall
St. Ursula
Kaiserplatz 13 A
80803 Munich / Germany
On the occasion of the International Holocaust Remembrance Day
A time like this perverts our hearts
under the patronage of Dr. h.c. Charlotte Knobloch, President of the Jewish Community of Munich and Upper Bavaria
A reading of selected texts by Stefan Zweig commemorating the 75th anniversary of his death
Born in 1881 in Vienna, Stefan Zweig grew up in an upper middle class family. The experiences of World War I turned him into a pacifist. After 1918, he worked for the peaceful reunion of Europe with his fatherly friend Romain Rolland.
Until age 52, Zweig lived a very successful life. He published a number of books and plays, travelled a lot, and in numerous lectures he promoted his dream of restructuring the world based on humanistic virtues. Molded by the spirit and the work of Erasmus of Rotterdam, deeply convinced of the inner personal freedom of man, and inspired by the idea of Europe, Zweig worked for a spiritually united Europe, in which there was no room for nationalism and revenge.
After the Nazis came into power, he emigrated to England. His books were burned by the Nazis. With the start of World War II, Zweig realized that the dream of a Europe united in the spirit of humanism, of which he had not only dreamed as a utopia, but whose realization he had worked for with all his spiritual and creative powers for almost two decades, was irrevocably destroyed. He went to live in Petropolis in Brazil. The continuing war, and the increasingly dark prospects in Europe finally depressed him so much that he committed suicide during the night of February 22, 1942.
Zweig once wrote to Richard Strauss: “All real works of art have the power to overcome resistance.” Zweig was enough of a realist to see what the world around him was really like. But he does not stop at just picturing this world of reality. His books move us to develop energies for doing away with the deplorable state of affairs he describes. Every line challenges us, his readers, to overcome our own sluggishness of heart.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads Stefan Zweig’s texts.
Admission: free – donations for our project “Art and Education without Borders” are welcome
Presented by Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive in cooperation with the Parish of St. Ursula Munich-Schwabing
Logo Pfarrverband
 
Tuesday, January 24, 2017, at 12.30 pm
German Embassy
Vienna / Austria
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts.
By invitation only
presented by the German Embassy Vienna
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

Logo Deutsche Botschaft in Wien

 
 
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