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News of The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
 
Tuesday, December 19, 2017, at 8.00 pm
Parish Hall
St. Ursula
Kaiserplatz 13 A
80803 Munich / Germany
Our Death must be a Beacon
Poems and Letters by Libertas Schulze-Boysen
Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the execution of Libertas Schulze-Boysen by the Nazis
Libertas Schulze-Boysen and her husband Harro, along with Arvid Harnack and his wife Mildred (who was an American), formed the nucleus of the so-called “Red Orchestra”, a resistance group fighting Hitler and his regime. The “Red Orchestra” was one of the biggest and most diverse resistance groups: women and men, Christians and Marxists, workers, intellectuals and artists, they all gathered in this group, united by their opposition to the Nazi Regime. For years they helped German Jews and political dissidents to escape and also provided vital intelligence to both the US and Russia. In the summer of 1942 the Gestapo discovered their activities and arrested over 100 members of the group. More of 50 of them were sentenced to death and executed, among them Libertas Schulze-Boysen. After 1945 the historical contributions of the “Red Orchestra” were discussed very controversially and its achievements were often falsely labeled as pro-communist. Starting in the early 90’s the access to hitherto inaccessible documents in archives in Prague and Moscow helped to correct and re-write the history of Libertas Schulze-Boysen and her circle.
Libertas Schulze-Boysen was arrested by the Gestapo in September 1942 and executed on December 22, 1942 in Berlin. During her three months in prison, she wrote some very moving poems. These poems along with Libertas’s letters to her mother, show the enormous maturity, calmness and wisdom of the 29-year-old in the face of death and are a grand testimony of humanity and dignity.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Christine Ostermayer reads those texts
Admission: free
presented by the Parish of St. Ursula Munich
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo St. Ursula Munich
 
Saturday, November 18, 2017, at 7.00 pm
Goethe Institut
Auditorium
Campo dos Mártieres da Pátria, 37
1169-016 Lisbon / Portugal
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts
Admission: free
presented by the German Embassy in Portugal as part of the conference on “Portuguese Forced Laborers during the Nazi Regime”
Logo German Embassy in Portugal
 
Thursday, November 9, 2017, at 7.30 pm
Austrian Cultural Forum
11 East 52nd Street
New York, NY 10022
Resistance: Persecuted but not Silenced
For centuries artists and intellectuals have spearheaded movements and organized circles of resistance. They oppose unjust structures of power and continually remind us, that our societies should advance towards more justice, more freedom and more solidarity in keeping with the ideals of reason and the enlightenment. This claim was postulated by Ludwig A. Frankl in his poem “The University” supporting the goals of the revolution of March 1848 and by Sigmund Engländer in his satirical journal “Viennese Caterwauling”.
Political resistance was especially necessary during the reign of the Austro-Fascists and Nazis, when writers such as Joseph Roth, Theodor Kramer, Ernst Waldinger and Erich Fried opposed the dictatorial regimes, and politicians like Bruno Kreisky but also women from all walks of live – from Lisa Gavric and Anna Hannika to Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky and Ida Revertera (born Princess Schwarzenberg) resisted.
Today artists such as Elfriede Jelinek and Herta Müller prompt us in their novels, plays and poems to use our own brain and thus help to keep intact a culture of open and honest debate which is of utmost importance for the functioning and survival of democracy.
This collage unites resistive texts from three centuries with musical pieces by persecuted composers (among others Max Brand, Hanns Eisler, Ernst Krenek, and Viktor Ullmann) to a plea for hope, that the spirit of the enlightenment will prevail.
Concept and Introduction: Michael Lahr
Soprano: Jeannie Im
Piano: Dan Franklin Smith
Narrator: Gregorij H. von Leitis
Admission: free – reservations are necessary and can be made on the website oft he Austrian Cultural Forum at www.acfny.org (please click on „events“ and go the date of November 9 to find this particular event)
Presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum New York
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo ACF NYC
 
Tuesday, October 24, 2017, at 6.00 pm
German Consulate General
871 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017
Nietzsche: From his Protestant Origins to the Anti-Christ
A very special approach to Luther and Protestantism on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the reformation
Raised in a Protestant rectory and marked by the spirituality of pietism, Nietzsche first enrolled as a student of theology and philology. But already during his first year at the university in Bonn he turned away from Christianity and decided to focus solely on the studies of philology. During his years as a professor in “pious Basel” he again encounters the Pietist variety of Protestantism which was dominant among the urban middle class. Nietzsche’s reading of Hölderlin, his studies of antiquity, his encounter with the philosophy of Schopenhauer and finally his friendship with Richard Wagner spur a process of emancipation: Nietzsche becomes one of the great critical diagnosticians of his time, a moralist and brilliant proponent of the enlightenment, but at the same time one of the most pronounced critics of Christianity.
For his contemporaries Nietzsche seemed to be the Anti-Christ, mostly because of his dictum „God is dead“. As the “prophet of the overman” he assailed the philistine lifestyle of his bourgeois contemporaries and tried to lay a new foundation for morality “beyond good and evil”. And yet, in his most polemic book “The Anti-Christ”, the figure of Jesus was spared all criticism.
Friedrich Nietzsche regarded himself as the „thorn in the side“ of the decadent society and culture of his time. He was a stranger to his own era, and called himself a “posthumous thinker” whose hour would come in the future.
Michael Lahr will try to outline and reconstruct the extraordinary train of thought of Nietzsche
Gregorij von Leitis will read key passages of Nietzsche’s works.
Admission: free – Reservations are required
Further information at ku-s1-gk@newy.auswaertiges-amt.de
Presented by the German Consulate General New York
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo German Consulate General New York
 
Thursday, October 5, 2017, at 7.30 pm
Bohemian National Hall
321 East 73rd Street
New York, NY 10021
The Gospel According to Kafka
A literary Collage
In his stories, Franz Kafka (1883 – 1924) leaves behind the realm of the possible and probable world in order to better understand the real world. His protagonists often are helplessly confronted with anonymous powers; they are imprisoned in a maze without exit. Fear and failure are dominant topics. In vain his protagonists look for a way out. A master of the absurd, Kafka describes the most fantastic events with a clarity and precision, that leads the reader to the limits of thinking. In Kafka’s work the great upheaval of the 20th century is expressed almost like a vision. Like no other author, Kafka describes the emotional framework and living conditions of modernity. His name became almost equivalent with modern existence: today we call a situation “Kafkaesque” which cannot be explained in political, psychological or sociological terms.
Texts from Franz Kafka’s short stories, letters, diaries, and aphorisms are woven together to a poetic collage.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts.
Admission: free
presented by the Czech Consulate General New York
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo Czech Consulate General New York
 
Saturday, September 9, 2017 at 7.00 pm
Catania / Italy
Exact location to be announced
Nietzsche: From his Protestant Origins to the Anti-Christ
A very special approach to Luther and Protestantism on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the reformation
Raised in a Protestant rectory and marked by the spirituality of pietism, Nietzsche first enrolled as a student of theology and philology. But already during his first year at the university in Bonn he turned away from Christianity and decided to focus solely on the studies of philology. During his years as a professor in “pious Basel” he again encounters the Pietist variety of Protestantism which was dominant among the urban middle class. Nietzsche’s reading of Hölderlin, his studies of antiquity, his encounter with the philosophy of Schopenhauer and finally his friendship with Richard Wagner spur a process of emancipation: Nietzsche becomes one of the great critical diagnosticians of his time, a moralist and brilliant proponent of the enlightenment, but at the same time one of the most pronounced critics of Christianity.
For his contemporaries Nietzsche seemed to be the Anti-Christ, mostly because of his dictum „God is dead“. As the “prophet of the overman” he assailed the philistine lifestyle of his bourgeois contemporaries and tried to lay a new foundation for morality “beyond good and evil”. And yet, in his most polemic book “The Anti-Christ”, the figure of Jesus was spared all criticism.
Friedrich Nietzsche regarded himself as the „thorn in the side“ of the decadent society and culture of his time. He was a stranger to his own era, and called himself a “posthumous thinker” whose hour would come in the future.
Michael Lahr will try to outline and reconstruct the extraordinary train of thought of Nietzsche
Gregorij von Leitis will read key passages of Nietzsche’s works.
Admission: free
presented by the Lutheran Church of Sicily
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
 
Friday, September 8, 2017, at 7.00 pm
Syracuse / Italy
Exact location to be announced
Same Program as on Saturday, September 9
 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 7.00 pm
Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania
Charitéstraße 9
10117 Berlin / Germany
Lew Nussimbaum:
Cosmopolitan – Wanderer between two worlds – Jewish Moslem – Orientalist in Exile
Literary Collage from his fantastic oeuvre
75 years ago – on August 27, 1942 – the author and orientalist Essad Bey died in Positano / Italy lonely and destitute. He was not yet 37 years old when he succumbed to a rare disease. Only his Baltic-German nanny Alice Schulte was with him. She had known him from his earliest childhood, when he still was called Lew Nussimbaum.
Lew Nussimbaum was born on October 20, 1905 in Kiev as the only son of the rich Jewish Oil magnate Abraham Nussimbaum from Aserbaidschan and his Russian-Jewish wife Berta Slutsky. While Lew’s father made his fortune with the oil boom in Baku, his mother sympathized with the Bolshevik revolutionaries and secretly supported the young Stalin. When Lew was six years old, his mother, whose ancestors came from Lithuania and were members of the big Leites family, committed suicide.
When the Russian civil war ensuing from the October revolution finally reached Baku in 1918, father and son fled, first to neighboring Persia. Eventually in 1920 they emigrated via Georgia to Istanbul, and from there to Paris and Berlin. The 15-year-old Lew Nussimbaum initially attends the Grammar School of the Russian exile community and then enrolls in Arabic and Turkish literature at Berlin’s Humboldt University. In 1922 he converts to Islam
In Berlin he gets to know Elske Lasker-Schüler, Vladimir Nabokov and Boris Pasternak and soon starts writing, mainly for the newspaper „Die Literarische Welt“ (The Literary World) published by Willy Haas. His first book “Oil and Blood in the Orient”, a reconstruction of his childhood and escape from Baku was printed in 1929 and immediately became a best-seller.
In quick succession he published 13 other books, among them biographies of Mohammed, Stalin, Lenin and Nikolaus II. While some appreciate him as an expert of the Orient, others denigrate him as a Jewish cheater. Members of the Islamic community in Berlin distance themselves from Nussimbaum. The communists repudiate his books criticizing the Soviet Union as reactionary and undialectic. Lew Nussimbaum alias Essad Bey is caught between two stools. “Who is this Essad Bey?” Leo Trotzki asks in a letter in 1932.
In 1936, while he was already banned from publishing his works in Germany, Essad Bey under the nom de plume Kurban Said published his novel “Ali and Nino” in Vienna, a sort of Romeo and Juliet story playing at the intersection between Christianity and Islam.
After the “Anschluss” the exposed Essad Bey loses his protection in Vienna and flees via Switzerland to Italy. Lew Nussimbaum’s father Abraham stayed in Vienna and eventually was deported to Belzec and killed there.
Despite horrendous pain Essad Bey til the very end continues writing another novel “The man who didn’t understand anything of love.”
Concept and Introduction: Michael Lahr
Narrator: Gregorij H. von Leitis
Admission: free
Presented by the Lithuanian Embassy in Berlin
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo Litauische Botschaft Berlin
 
Saturday, August 26, 2017 at 3.30 pm
Augustinermuseum
Augustinerplatz
79098 Freiburg / Germany
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts
Admission: free
presented by the Augustinermuseum Freiburg
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 at 7.00 pm
Berlin / Germany
Elysium‘s Academy Program for Young Singers
Vienna salutes Berlin
Melissa Primavera, a young soprano from Chicago, presents songs by the Austrian-Jewish composer Egon Lustgarten, who had to flee Vienna after the “Anschluss” and found refuge in the United States. Lustgarten’s daughter gave most of the estate of her father to the Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive. In addition, Melissa Primavera will sing arias from Franz Léhar’s „The Merry Widow“ and Paul Abraham’s „Ball im Savoy.“ 2011 Melissa Primavera participated in Elysium’s 16th International Summer Academy in Bernried on the shores of lake Starnberg.
By invitation only
An event of Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
 
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 at 8.00 pm
Church of St. Mary
Stiftsstraße 4
32427 Minden / Germany
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts
Admission: free
presented by the Lutheran Church of St. Mary in Minden
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo Lutheran Church of St. Mary in Minden
 
Thursday, June 8, 2017, at 6.00 pm
Austrian Cultural Forum Bratislava
Hodzovo námestie 1 A
81106 Bratislava / Slovakia
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts
Piano: Zuzana Zamborská
Admission: free
presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum Bratislava
Logo Austrian Cultural Forum Bratislava
 
Sunday, May 28, 2017, at 7.00 pm
Village Church of Hornstorf
Hauptstraße 7
23974 Hornstorf
Nietzsche: From his Protestant Origins to the Anti-Christ
A very special approach to Luther and Protestantism on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the reformation
Raised in a Protestant rectory and marked by the spirituality of pietism, Nietzsche first enrolled as a student of theology and philology. But already during his first year at the university in Bonn he turned away from Christianity and decided to focus solely on the studies of philology. During his years as a professor in “pious Basel” he again encounters the Pietist variety of Protestantism which was dominant among the urban middle class. Nietzsche’s reading of Hölderlin, his studies of antiquity, his encounter with the philosophy of Schopenhauer and finally his friendship with Richard Wagner spur a process of emancipation: Nietzsche becomes one of the great critical diagnosticians of his time, a moralist and brilliant proponent of the enlightenment, but at the same time one of the most pronounced critics of Christianity.
For his contemporaries Nietzsche seemed to be the Anti-Christ, mostly because of his dictum „God is dead“. As the “prophet of the overman” he assailed the philistine lifestyle of his bourgeois contemporaries and tried to lay a new foundation for morality “beyond good and evil”. And yet, in his most polemic book “The Anti-Christ”, the figure of Jesus was spared all criticism.
Friedrich Nietzsche regarded himself as the „thorn in the side“ of the decadent society and culture of his time. He was a stranger to his own era, and called himself a “posthumous thinker” whose hour would come in the future.
Michael Lahr will try to outline and reconstruct the extraordinary train of thought of Nietzsche
Gregorij von Leitis will read key passages of Nietzsche’s works.
Admission: free
presented by the Lutheran Church of Hornstorf
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo Hornstorf
 
Thursday, March 30, 2017, at 12.00 noon
Lotos Club
5 East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065
30th Annual Erwin Piscator Award Luncheon
to benefit our International Educational Programs
James C. Nicola will be presented with the Erwin Piscator Award 2017 for his enormous contributions to the American theatre by producing and cultivating artists whose works inspire and challenge the public. Since 1988 he has been Artistic Director of New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW). Under his guidance, NYTW has remained steadfast to its founding commitment of nurturing both established and emerging theatre artists, promoting collaboration and bold experimentation with theatrical forms. As Artistic Director, Mr. Nicola has been instrumental in the development of many of NYTW world premieres, including Once; Peter and the Starcatcher; Jonathan Larson's Rent; Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen's Aftermath; Claudia Shear's Blown Sideways Through Life and Dirty Blonde; and Will Power's The Seven, as well as the American premieres of Caryl Churchill's Mad Forest, Far Away, and A Number; and Doug Wright's Quills and Tony Kushner's Homebody/Kabul. Mr. Nicola fueled his love of theatre during the early 1970s when he was an Assistant Director at The Young Vic / National Theatre of Great Britain and an Assistant Stage Manager at London's Royal Court Theatre.
The philanthropist Marina Kellen French will receive the Honorary Erwin Piscator Award in memory of Maria Ley Piscator for her lifelong commitment and tireless dedication to support the arts and culture. Mrs. French has served on the Trustee Council of the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. for 35 years. She also has been serving on the Board of the Metropolitan Opera for 37 years, and served on the Board of the Metropolitan Opera Guild. After the death of her father, Stephen Kellen, in 2004 Mrs. French became a Trustee of Carnegie Hall, continuing the family's tradition: For the past 34 years the Kellen's, through their foundation, have made it possible for the Berlin Philharmonic to come to New York and give concerts at Carnegie Hall's Stern Auditorium. At the initiative of Clive Gillinson Marina became involved as one of the founding patrons to launch the National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America. As a Trustee at the American Academy in Berlin, which is housed in the childhood-home of her mother Anna-Maria Kellen, Mrs. French has endowed the Marina Kellen French Distinguished Visitorship for persons with outstanding accomplishments in the cultural world. In 2012, Mrs. French became a Trustee at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In addition, Marina is a Life Trustee of the Morgan Library and of Channel 13, and also serves on the Director's Circle of the Frick Collection. In 2014, she was awarded the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany.
Admission: $ 350 (tickets are tax-deductible for the full amount less $ 85)
To receive an invitation please contact Michael Lahr by eMail
 
Thursday, February 16, 2017, at 7.30 pm
Austrian Cultural Forum
11 East 52nd Street
New York, NY 10022
Suffering and Longing in Exile
Stefan Zweig and Frédéric Chopin – A Musical-Literary Collage
On February 22, we commemorate the 75th anniversary of the death of Stefan Zweig. Desperate and depressed that the “World of Yesterday” which he had so brilliantly analyzed and portraited in his autobiography, was forever lost, he committed suicide in Brazil.
After the end of World War I, Zweig had worked for a spiritually united Europe, in which there was no room for nationalism and revenge. Molded by the spirit and the work of Erasmus of Rotterdam, Zweig was deeply convinced of the inner personal freedom of man, and inspired by the idea of Europe.
Once Stefan Zweig wrote to the German composer Richard Strauss: “All real works of art have the power to overcome resistance.” Zweig was enough of a realist to see what the world around him was really like. But he does not stop at just picturing this world of reality. Many of Zweig’s experiences are highly topical today. His books move us to develop energies for doing away with the deplorable state of affairs he describes. Every line challenges us, his readers, to overcome our own sluggishness of the heart.
A century earlier, composer Frédéric Chopin also experienced the sufferings and longings of life in exile. Especially in his more than 60 Mazurkas, those pieces based on the traditional Polish dance, Chopin expressed the longing for his native Poland which he had left in 1830 at the age of 20. Shortly thereafter the November Uprising took place. When the uprising was crushed a little later, Chopin felt extreme anguish. He would never return to Poland.
Giving succinct, insightful remarks, Marjan Kiepura will interpret four famous works by Chopin, including two Mazurkas.
Michael Lahr will introduce Zweig’s life and work and his continuing relevance.
Gregorij von Leitis will read Stefan Zweig’s texts.
Admission: free – reservations are necessary and can be made on the website oft he Austrian Cultural Forum at www.acfny.org (please click on „events“ and go the date of February 16 to find this particular event)
Presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum New York
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo ACF NYC
 
Tuesday, February 1, 2017, at 6.30 pm
Central Synagogue
Ekzarh Joseph 10
1000 Sofia / Bulgarien
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts.
Admission: free – reservations and further information by eMail
presented by the German Embassy Sofia and the Central Synagogue Sofia
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive
Logo Deutsche Botschaft in Sofia
Logo Synagoge Sofia
 
Friday, January 27, 2017, at 7.30 pm
Parish Hall
St. Ursula
Kaiserplatz 13 A
80803 Munich / Germany
On the occasion of the International Holocaust Remembrance Day
A time like this perverts our hearts
under the patronage of Dr. h.c. Charlotte Knobloch, President of the Jewish Community of Munich and Upper Bavaria
A reading of selected texts by Stefan Zweig commemorating the 75th anniversary of his death
Born in 1881 in Vienna, Stefan Zweig grew up in an upper middle class family. The experiences of World War I turned him into a pacifist. After 1918, he worked for the peaceful reunion of Europe with his fatherly friend Romain Rolland.
Until age 52, Zweig lived a very successful life. He published a number of books and plays, travelled a lot, and in numerous lectures he promoted his dream of restructuring the world based on humanistic virtues. Molded by the spirit and the work of Erasmus of Rotterdam, deeply convinced of the inner personal freedom of man, and inspired by the idea of Europe, Zweig worked for a spiritually united Europe, in which there was no room for nationalism and revenge.
After the Nazis came into power, he emigrated to England. His books were burned by the Nazis. With the start of World War II, Zweig realized that the dream of a Europe united in the spirit of humanism, of which he had not only dreamed as a utopia, but whose realization he had worked for with all his spiritual and creative powers for almost two decades, was irrevocably destroyed. He went to live in Petropolis in Brazil. The continuing war, and the increasingly dark prospects in Europe finally depressed him so much that he committed suicide during the night of February 22, 1942.
Zweig once wrote to Richard Strauss: “All real works of art have the power to overcome resistance.” Zweig was enough of a realist to see what the world around him was really like. But he does not stop at just picturing this world of reality. His books move us to develop energies for doing away with the deplorable state of affairs he describes. Every line challenges us, his readers, to overcome our own sluggishness of heart.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads Stefan Zweig’s texts.
Admission: free – donations for our project “Art and Education without Borders” are welcome
Presented by Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive in cooperation with the Parish of St. Ursula Munich-Schwabing
Logo Pfarrverband
 
Tuesday, January 24, 2017, at 12.30 pm
German Embassy
Vienna / Austria
Hate is a Failure of Imagination
A Literary Collage – An Encouraging Testimony
under the patronage of Former German Chancellor Dr. Helmut Kohl and Prof. Felix Kolmer (Prague), Advisor / Foundation for Holocaust Victims
with texts by Alice Herz-Sommer, Georg Kafka, Paul Aron Sandfort, Leo Strauss, Viktor Ullmann, and Ilse Weber
The wave of terror attacks on the one hand and of right-wing hate crimes on the other hand have drastically reminded us, how hatred can blind people and how much destruction and violence an inhuman ideology can unleash. The artists who were incarcerated in Theresienstadt have defied the Nazis’ hatred and contempt for them in their own way. They countered this hate with a powerful offensive of imagination. With their artistic fantasy, their creative power, their inventive energy they continuously proved wrong the national-socialist dictum, that Jews were sub-human and as such incapable of any real culture. The life-affirming words of these artists can encourage us today, to break through the spiral of hate, violence and destruction.
Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leitis reads those texts.
By invitation only
presented by the German Embassy Vienna
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents und The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

Logo Deutsche Botschaft in Wien

 
 
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